Archive for the ‘Stencil Nation’ Category

 

SFWeekly Best Of

┬áBest Way to see the Mission Before it’s Annexed to Google – 2013

Scout for Street Art Walking Tour

http://Vayable.com

Russell Howze describes his tour as a “three hour zigzag through the Mission District.” For fans of street art, or anyone curious about the changing city, it’s a zigzag worth taking. Howze has been chronicling the stencils, tags, murals and graffiti that decorate San Francisco for 15 years, and is the author of the street art tome Stencil Nation. His tour explores alleys that will be new to residents and tourists alike, and keeps an eye on the shifting cultural tides of the neighborhood. “Urban landscapes are always changing,” Howze said, pointing out that while many of the tech workers moving into the Mission appreciate street art, they also bring security cameras and fences.

2013 SF Weekly Best Of Winner....

2013 SF Weekly Best Of Winner….

In the Facebook worlds, posting all this stuff is instant, and friends find things and post them. I take the trouble to pull things off of there for the Stencil Archive, my own archives, etc. and then maybe, just maybe, post it on here. I forget that some friends don’t do Facebook! And I have to remind myself that this blog belongs to me, as opposed to a multi-billion dollar corporation that is currently dot com booming the Bay Area. This site is also a great, long archive of my life here in San Francisco.

So back in late January, Regan Ha-Ha Tamanui stopped over on his way back to New Zealand and Australia. He’d been traveling the world for a year, but got stuck in Berlin for eight months. How unlucky. I got him four walls here in SF, and he took my photo after a day of wandering around the Tenderloin looking at street art. He cut a stencil portrait out of that photo, as well as the photo he took of my friend Monica that evening in Hayes Valley.

Icy and Sot, expats from Iran who now live in Brooklyn (leave Iran to have a street art show, go back to Iran and get arrested for satanism) were driving through. They all took my tour and I got them two walls to paint on. Regan collaborated with them. Icy and Sot came back to SF for an art show at a Noise Pop concert. I missed it (always seem to miss the good art shows!).

Here are photos from early Feb, with the stencil portraits thrown in.

S.F. NEIGHBORHOODS Graffiti marring much of city’s street art – vandalism on the rise
Matthai Kuruvila
Published 4:54 pm, Thursday, December 27, 2012


Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/crime/article/SF-murals-become-targets-for-vandals-4150191.php#ixzz2GeFBUSjw

Muralists around San Francisco say that they’ve seen an increase in vandalism of murals by taggers, who are defacing the art with their monikers.
Vandals have wrecked murals from North Beach to the Tenderloin. In the city’s liveliest mural zone, the Mission District, muralists say it’s been particularly bad. Street paintings made in months have been ravaged in seconds.

“There’s been a very specific mural destruction going on,” said Russell Howze, a muralist and author who does street art tours of the Mission District. “There’s really no logic. I don’t know if there’s any organization or conspiracy behind it. More than anything, these murals are well-loved and huge amounts of time have gone into them.”

Vandals this year have defaced parts of the Mission District’s Clarion Alley, a 20-year-old street museum of murals. “Gold Mountain,” a North Beach mural depicting Chinese history, had to be repainted when the building owners couldn’t keep it free of graffiti.

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The Mission District: San Francisco’s Street Art

16 December 2012
Hanna Wolf
From the Fair Observer (link here)

Street Art – The Fun Loving Criminals?
For many decades, street artists have made San Francisco’s Mission District one of the most colourful and fascinating places to see [7], mirroring the city’s vibrant multiculturalism and diversity.

We are walking through some of the stinkiest alleys in San Francisco, yet still tourists from all over the world come here to take pictures and admire the street art gallery surrounding them. Whether huge murals, stickers on the floor or graffiti: art is all around in this area of the city.

Our tour guide Russell Howze, who offers street art tours through the Mission District, has been walking through these alleys for 15 years, and still he discovers new pieces. “Once you train your eyes, it’s everywhere” is what he tells us as he points at a street light covered with almost torn off stickers and scribbled words, which would normally never catch someone’s eyes as art.

The Higher, the Better

Walking through Mission and Valencia Street we come across walls with both illegal and legal graffiti, stencils and other street art styles. Comics as well as posters and abstract pieces look down on us from the left as we try to read a graffiti on the right. Unlike in European metropolises, in San Francisco trains are no major hotspots for graffiti. The sprayers here prefer trucks instead and almost every truck we pass during the tour wears at least a small graffiti tag.

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Spacecraft presents “The Outsiders,” a mixed media group-show of artists working with propelled pigment and scavenged objects as alternative materials. This exhibition looks into the artistic symbols of opposition and speaks from the language of accessibility. During this new century, Aerosol media’s techniques and methods are increasingly being incorporated in a wide range of contemporary work. Spacecraft welcomes you to examine these select works by Bay Area artists. We hope to explore this dialogue further. Until then, please join us on Thursday, December 13th at 7 p.m. for Spacecraft’s “The Outsiders” at Inner Mission [formally CELLspace].

Artwork by
- Erick Andino – Michelle Guintu – Cory, aka, C SkwaReD
- Corey Best – Russell Howze – Cy Wagoner
- Roland Blandy – Sam Lewin – Todd Hanson
- Spencer Cunningham – Rye Purvis – And more

outsiders6

outsidersback4 (more…)

Original Article Here.

Russell Howze has been enthralled with the street art of San Francisco for decades. He can instantly recognize the work of the city’s most prominent graffiti artists, and knows which Mission District alleys house the most memorable pieces. Howze, a stencil artist himself, maintains a website dedicated to street art, and has written a book on the subject.

As a general rule, graffiti doesn’t pay; Howze is driven by his love of the art form, not by profits. But with the help of a new startup called Vayable, he’s beginning to turn his passion into a career as a tour guide, helping travelers discover the hidden artworks on city buildings and sidewalks. “It’s starting to pay a lot of the bills,” he says. As his reputation grows, he hopes he may be able to turn his street art curator side gig into a full-time job.

Vayable is an online platform that helps travelers find new experiences led by local guides. “The company was born out of my own experiences as a traveler,” says founder and CEO, Jamie Wong. “I love going off the beaten path when I travel, and friends started asking me to create experiences for them to replicate my trips. I built the company to expand beyond my own experiences, and help everyone find that sense of cross-cultural exploration.”

Vayable launched with 70 guides in April 2011, and customers began booking experiences within the first hour of going live. Since then, the company’s been growing at a rate of 30 percent each week.

In San Francisco, Howze’s three-hour street art tour of the Mission District is a top seller; other popular experiences in the region include a sommelier-guided tour of Northern California wineries; a fishing excursion in the San Francisco Bay; and a guided biking tour through the city.

The concept marks a sea change from the traditional tourism industry, which is dominated by large companies that stick to tried-and-true tourist attractions. Vayable is dedicated to giving its users choices in how they want to experience an area, encouraging them to follow their own passions in planning a trip.

Though some guides had been offering professional tours independently prior to working with Vayable, many are new to the field. “Many of our guides are everyday people with access to special knowledge, or a community or space. We’re giving anybody the tools to build and curate an experience out of their interests or passions,” says Wong.

Vayable allows guides to set the prices for their tours, collecting a 15% commission on confirmed bookings. “Many of the guides are supplementing their income in really significant ways,” says Wong. “They love the flexibility. They can have a day job and then follow their passion when they’re not at work and supplement their income through Vayable, to help them pay the bills or afford a trip.”

The company is now offering experiences in over 600 cities on six continents, and growing every day. “With technology, there’s a whole new way to connect,” says Wong. “We’re using these online connections to power offline interactions, and to help travelers and locals alike find meaningful ways to connect with new communities.”

Putting the money into murals and stencils.

Putting the micro-entrepreneurial money into murals and stencils.

FastCompany slide show is here. (more…)

During my 2008/9 Stencil Nation book tour, I set up an event with Matteo Grieder at his art space Zeitvertrieb in Vienna, Austria. Matteo was nervous about the turnout (a common anxiety during my European tour), but I had Pod and Austrian artist Dieter Puntigam backing me up with live VJ and DJing. A nice crowd came for my presentation, bought books, ate and drank, and made a great scene for the event. Matteo was surprised and happy with the results.

A month ago, Matteo approached me with a request for photo submissions to his fun art zine “Artyfucked”. It is mostly a sketch zine, but he also features street art from cities around the world. Issue #8 features my stencil photos (the cream of the crop) from SF. They mostly cover 2011′s greatest hits. He also put them all in an online album.

Support a great project and buy a copy of “Artyfucked” today!

Company offers quirky tours in San Francisco and beyond

By: Alexis Terrazas | 11/06/11 10:03 PM
Special to The Examiner

Jamie Wong, the founder and CEO of Vayable, a site that allows people to book and sell local tours ranging from how to be a hipster to living like the homeless for a day, launched her company in April.

What’s the underlying goal of Vayable? Our goal is to enable entrepreneurship and promote cultural understanding, and really provide people with a new way to explore their world. Part of it is being part of this generation who are not following mainstream careers.

Do you consider yourself to be an entrepreneur? I do. I’ve always been entrepreneurial. My passion has always been travel and cultural immersion. I’ve been to more than 30 countries and I speak four languages, but I never had the money to do it because I worked in media and journalism.

Is there one local tour guide who stands out? Russell Howze, who is our guide for Scout for Street Art in S.F. Our team met him on another Vayable tour. He was touring his own family and friends because he was so passionate about it. Then he realized by meeting us that he could monetize this. He works at a nonprofit art gallery in the Mission, and he’s using his [Vayable] money to help restore their murals.

Read more at the San Francisco Examiner: http://www.sfexaminer.com/local/3-minute-interview/2011/11/company-offers-quirky-tours-san-francisco-and-beyond#ixzz1d68YHM6Q

Book my tour and see the fruits of my labors!

Russell’s Mural Project from vayable on Vimeo.

Stopped by 941 Geary space again a few days ago and snapped these shots of the Young & Free install. See you all tomorrow (Sat.) at the opening.

10 Sep: Young & Free in SF

Author: Russell

Met up with Ha-Ha last night to catch up and welcome him and the other artists to San Francisco. He happened to have a key to the studio, so took me over to show me the walls. The long hallway entrance to 941 Geary will be covered in street art and graffiti, similar to the famous Hoosier Lane in Melbourne. Ha-Ha said that the coverage was in progress, so expect more layers than these sneak peak photos have. After the tour, I bought Ha-Ha a pint at a local dive bar where the crew has designated their local watering hole. Good to see some of these folks I met around the world in 2008 when I launched my Stencil Nation tour.

Go to this show Sat.: http://www.youngandfreeart.com/